Processing Online Tutorials

19 04 2008

Daniel Shiffman, professor tat Tisch School of the Arts at NYU basically publishes all his tutorials online.  Learning from here.  Best place to start.

TUTORIALS:

http://www.shiffman.net/teaching/

NATURE OF CODE LECTURE:

http://www.shiffman.net/teaching/nature/

PLUS TUTORIALS ON THE MAIN SITE:

http://www.processing.org/learning/index.html

Daniel Shiffman also created a project I am quite interested in, combining a pollack inspiration with interactivity.  See video below.

http://www.shiffman.net/projects/swarm





Jared Tarbell’s Complexification

19 04 2008

This seems to be one of the best, if not the best sites with Processing. His work is more than amazing, it is simple, subtle and reminds me of something Peter Campus said at a talk I went to at the Tate Modern. Art should be ‘transcendental.’ His work does just that.

http://complexification.net

Happy Place

*Please click on the image to view the interaction.

The work above basically shows particles seeking each other.  Brilliant.  The one below shows particle collisions.

Bubble Chamber

*Please click on the image to view the interaction.

And this one, I particularly love about creation and destruction.

Binary Ring

*Please click on the image to see the video.

Basically, if I can create something like this I would be over the moon.  What interests me, are the congruences between what he uses and the earlier research that I have done on particles, particle entanglement, the combination of drawing, interactivity and video.  All of a sudden, I feel that my work is coming to a point where everything is meeting and I am beginning to understand.  Now, it is about getting the work done, following through and basically working out the kinks in the system.  Seeing this work is not only inspiring, but moving.  It reveals how much potential this medium has for inciting experiences viewers have the chance to finally feel.





Robert Hodgin’s Flight404

19 04 2008


Solar

*Click on image to see the video.

From Hodgin’s Solar I figured that I can use sound in my interpretation of the project. The sound can not necessarily be modulated, but used as a sort of trigger for mini explosions that take place within the viewer. Like how we react to stimuli, and experience it not in the mind but in the body. The idea is to have these explosions take place, and through these chemical reactions, colors change and perhaps create a more interesting combination of transformations and ‘infections’ between the viewers.

Magnetic Ink

*Please click image to see video.

I think the brilliant thing about his work, and how he is personally pushing this Processing medium is in his unique interpretation of sound. Though, I personally do not want to use music in the work (though after seeing his work it is quite tempting), I feel that the natural sound from the installation space would suffice as triggers of the experience. This was also an idea that Jonathan Kearney gave me during our tutorial with him. In a way, this eliminates the possibility of it becoming a music video, and becomes something more subtle, that can exist in a gallery space.

Advanced Beauty

*Please click image to see video.





Zai Chang’s White Noise

19 04 2008

Reading the Processing book by Reas and Fry and found this artist who basically did what I wanted to do. His name is Zai Chang and he created white noise. Viewers are seen as particles that basically affect each other (infect each other more like) with different colors merging and exchanging. The overlapping of different people, creates and exchange of particles. Quite interesting. Will try to find his code. Here is an image of his project:

*Click on the image to see a video of his interactive project.

I will be developing the idea further, interpreting it in my own way. More to come…but first to find the code.





Mark Rothko on Expressing Experience

13 04 2008

http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Mark_Rothko/quotes.html

April 12,2008

“I’m not an abstractionist. I’m not interested in the relationship of color or form or anything else. I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.”

http://www.nga.gov/feature/rothko/classic1.shtm

“The fact that people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures shows that I can communicate those basic human emotions.. the people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when painting them. And if you say you are moved only by their color relationships then you miss the point.”

http://www.nga.gov/feature/rothko/abstraction1a.shtm


“I don’t express myself in my paintings. I express my not-self.”

http://www.nga.gov/feature/rothko/late4a.shtm

“It was with the utmost reluctance that I found the figure could not serve my purposes….But a time came when none of us could use the figure without mutilating it.”

National Gallery of Art Washington

http://www.nga.gov/feature/rothko/myths1.shtm






Joshua Bell Interview with the Washington Post

13 04 2008

What is this life if, full of care,

We have no time to stand and stare.

— from “Leisure,” by W.H. Davies

— quoted from the article:

Pearls Before Breakfast

Washington Post Staff Writer

Sunday, April 8, 2007; Page W10

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html

http://www.bsomusicians.org/UserFiles/Image/Joshua_Bell_by_Chris_Lee_504.jp

‘It’s like a juggler, he says, who can keep those balls in play while interacting with a crowd. What he’s mostly thinking about as he plays, Bell says, is capturing emotion as a narrative: “When you play a violin piece, you are a storyteller, and you’re telling a story.”‘

It was an experiment…where a world famous violinist would play at a tube station for an hour and would see what happened. Only a handful of people stopped…most just rushed to work…but all the children looked. Sometimes, I think of our conditioning and how we lose our connection to beauty as we grow older.

‘The poet Billy Collins once laughingly observed that all babies are born with a knowledge of poetry, because the lub-dub of the mother’s heart is in iambic meter. Then, Collins said, life slowly starts to choke the poetry out of us. It may be true with music, too.’

I think of priorities, and I wonder what these priorities are really for if we can’t see what’s right in front of us.





Shine Interview: Director Kimberly Peirce

13 04 2008

Director and writer of ‘Stop-loss’ and ‘Boys Don’t Cry.’

Advice to Women Directors:

‘…they need to accept that that’s the job, that you are the central storyteller and that’s what everyone is going to look at you for, your casting director, your producer, your studio, your actor, your editor. So the advice I’d give to women is the advice I’d give to all young artists: just keep following your curiosity. Be relentless about it, it’s a privilege to make art so you have to earn that privilege and learn your craft, and if you’re super committed and talented, I believe you’ll make it.’

Recommended Films:

“Battle of Algiers”
[This film] has been something that I just lately have been returning to and returning to and
returning to. I think stylistically its so raw and immediate, I love the close-ups of the faces you get and I love the sentiment of the women who are dressing up and willing to go in and drop these bombs. It’s just this quest for human freedom and change that’s just so powerful.

“8 ½” and “La Dolce Vita
It really was amazing to me when I watched those movies when I was younger and I was like, wow, you can write movies about love and sex and life and it can be raw and they can feel the way life feels when it’s lived. That was amazing to me.

http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/entertainment/shine-interview-3a-director-kimberly-pierce-158878/

by Anne Ichikawa, Shine staff, on Fri Apr 11, 2008 5:29am PDT








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